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West Harlem Community Benefits Agreement

On May 18, 2009, Columbia University President Lee Bollinger and the President of the West Harlem Local Development Corporation (WHLDC) signed the West Harlem Community Benefits Agreement (CBA) marking a unique partnership between the University and the residents in Manhattan’s Community District 9. The agreement, along with commitments made to the City and the State over the course of the formal approval processes for the Manhattanville expansion project, encompasses not only a financial commitment on the part of the University, but also a commitment of both “in-kind” resources and advice and guidance on a range of issues and programs.

While much of the CBA relates to financial or physical resources, the University responded to community desire to not simply focus on cash benefits, but to develop a more substantial relationship between the community and the academic resources of the University, especially with Columbia University’s Office of Government and Community Affairs.  GCA, working with Office of the Provost, helped to ensure that there are a number of ways in which the agreement reflects this desire.  Ultimately, these elements make our CBA not just a straightforward developer’s compensation to an impacted community, but rather a unique opportunity for Town/Gown partnership.

GCA maintains an ongoing relationship with the West Harlem Development Corporation (WHDC) and works with others in the University to ensure its obligations under the CBA are met.  Through its ongoing partnership, GCA works to optimize the longstanding relationship that the University has established with the WHDC, in order maximize our joint potential for the West Harlem community.

To learn more about the Manhattanville Expansion Project, visit Columbia University’s Office of Government and Community Affairs at http://gca.columbia.edu/

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Columbia University Civic Programs and Initiatives

Columbia University’s Office of Government and Community Affairs maintains relationships with community-based organizations, government officials, corporations, minority entrepreneurs, developers, and related departments within the University.  The office works to maintain and expand  knowledge of existing businesses in the local marketplace, and to support area enterprise development in neighboring communities.  Currently, the Office of Government and Community Affair’s economic development work is largely focused on activities related to the University’s expansion into Manhattanville.

GCA also works in tangent with, and in support of, the Columbia-Harlem Small Business Development Center, a program of the U.S. Small Business Administration that provides technical assistance to small businesses and non- profits, as well as workforce development for youth and veterans.  The real world experience of the Columbia Harlem SBDC provides Columbia’s student body and faculty members’ opportunities to assist the thousands of small businesses and non-profit organizations within the upper Manhattan community, in addition to providing the Harlem community the benefit of the resources and brain power of a top ranked university. 

For more information on the Office of Government and Community Affairs at Columbia University, please visit http://gca.columbia.edu/

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Broadway Community, Inc.

Broadway Community, Inc.
601 West 114th St.
New York, NY 10025
212-864-6100, ext. 120
Fax: 212-222-5609

bciboard@broadwaycommunity.org

info@broadwaycommunity.org

http://www.broadwaycommunity.org

Broadway Community, Inc. provides emergency food, clothing and shelter to those in need,
as well as long-term support aimed at healing the body, mind and spirit.

BCI represents a community of people who have committed themselves to rebuilding their lives, restoring harmed relationships with their children, families, and friends, and healing their bodies, minds, and spirits to prepare to work again and live the lives they were intended to live.

In 2011 BCI impacted the lives of hundreds of people with meals, showers, shelter, counseling, healing workshops, internships and training.

BCI’s services include:

  • SHELTER 8:45P.M. – 6:45A.M. 7 DAYS
  • SOUP KITCHEN 12:30P.M. – 2:00 P.M. MON. & WED.
  • FOOD PANTRY 3:00 P.M. – 6:00P.M. FRI.
  • SHOWER PROGRAM 10:15A.M. – 1:15 P.M. MON. & FRI.
  • CLOTHING CLOSET WED. 1:30P.M. – 2:30 P.M.
  • REFERRALS – BCI- MON., WED., FRI. 10:00 A.M. – 3:00 P.M.

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Susan and Jack Rudin Center for Community Outreach

Every day the Va’ad Gemilut Hasadim: Susan and Jack Rudin Center for Community Outreach provides a variety of opportunities for JTS community members to go out into the local New York City community and volunteer to help.

The Va’ad seeks to promote community service at JTS through its hands-on volunteer opportunities, educational programs, and Annual Tzedakah Campaign.

History of the Va’ad Gemilut Hasadim

Since the early 1980s, the Va’ad has provided some of the most rewarding volunteer and educational activities at JTS.

The Va’ad has a history of responding quickly and effectively to national and world need in times of emergency. Students organize special fund-raising events to benefit tragedy-stricken communities, aid the victims of natural disasters, and support the State of Israel. In addition, funds are raised throughout the year for the Va’ad’s Tzedakah Campaign, and are donated to organizations in need in the United States, Israel, and the world.

Gemilut hasadim is an ongoing and long-term process. Sometimes the need can seem vast and overhwleming, but the Va’ad reminds people that the task begins one person at a time.

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Columbia Office of Community Affairs Blood Drive and Marrow Drive

Spring Blood Drive Campaign

Over the years, Columbians have been very generous in donating blood for various causes and, in the process, have helped save the lives of many along the way – from trauma and cancer patients, to accident / burn victims, at-risk infants, and those with blood disorders. It is because of this generosity of volunteer blood donors in the Columbia community that patients and their families do not have to shoulder the burden of replacing blood when needed.

Wednesday, April 16
9:30am – 2:00pm
Lerner Hall Auditorium
Hosted by Columbia’s Events Management (UEM) Team

Monday, April 21
10:00am – 4:00pm
Studebaker, 4th Floor Conference Room
Hosted by Columbia’s HR Department

Thursday, April 24 – Two locations:
10:30am – 4:30pm
Columbia Business School
URIS Hall – Hepburn Lounge
Hosted by Columbia’s Graduate School of Business
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9:30am – 2:00pm
Low Library Rotunda
Hosted by Columbia’s Officers of Administration – Low library

Spring Bone Marrow Drive

There is a great need for bone marrow donors, particularly for people between the ages of 18 and 44 who are from multiracial, and multi-ethnic communities. Patients will mostly match with a donor within the same ethnic group. Columbia University’s Lambda Phi Epsilon, in conjunction with the Asian American Donor Program (AADP), will be hosting a bone marrow drive on Friday, April 11 between the hours of 10:00am and 6:00pm at the West Ramp Lounge in Lerner Hall.

For more information on the latest with Columbia University’s Office of Government and Community Affairs, please visit http://gca.columbia.edu/

 

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Growing Together: An Update on Community Services, Amenities, and Benefits of Columbia University’s Manhattanville Campus in West Harlem

Th Growing Together – Update to the Community publication provides an update on construction progress as well as information about many of the programs and services offered to the local community under the Declaration of Covenants & Restrictions  (as agreed to with Empire State Development) and the West Harlem CommunityBenefits Agreement (as agreed to with the West Harlem Development Corporation) related to Columbia University’s Manhattanville Campus.

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Community Impact at Columbia University

Community Impact at Columbia University
105 Earl Hall 2980 Broadway
New York​​, NY 10027
(212) 854-1492
Youth programs: Andrea Summers (as4220@columbia.edu)
Adult education: Rendolph Walker (rw2344@columbia.edu)
Health/Emergency programs: Lucia Rutter (lsr2148@columbia.edu)
All other inquiries: Community Impact Student Executives (ciexecs@columbia.edu)

 

Community Impact is a nonprofit organization located at Columbia University. Community Impact (CI) serves disadvantaged people in the Harlem, Washington Heights, and Morningside Heights communities. Community Impact strives to provide high quality programs, advance the public good, and foster meaningful volunteer opportunities for students, faculty, and staff of Columbia University. CI provides food, clothing, shelter, education, job training, and companionship for residents in its surrounding communities. CI consists of a dedicated corps of about 900 Columbia University student volunteers participating in 27 community service programs, which serve more than 8,000 people each year. Community Impact has partnerships with more than 100 community organizations and agencies who do service work in the Harlem, Washington Heights, and Morningside Heights communities, including service organizations, social service offices, religious institutions, and schools. Many of these organizations refer their clients to Community Impact’s programs and work collaboratively to positively influence residents’ lives.

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New York City Civic Engagement Program

New York City Civic Engagement Program, Barnard College

3009 Broadway

New York, NY 10027

 

Prof. Jonathan Rieder
Professor of Sociology
Director, New York City Civic Engagement Program
jrieder@barnard.edu
(212) 854-4359

 

Junea Williams-Edmund
Associate Director, Civic Engagement
Career Development
jmwillia@barnard.edu
(212) 854-4214
(212) 854-2188 (Fax)

Founded in 2003, Barnard College’s New York City Civic Engagement Program (NYCCEP) introduces individuals to community leaders and activists, organizations, and strategies to help them advance in addressing local and global issues.

 

NYCCEP aids Barnard College in using the city’s resources in a thoughtful way, and to educate students to become active, engaged citizens and leaders of a global community.

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Riverside Church Food Pantry, Clothing, and Showers

The Riverside Church

490 Riverside Drive

New York, NY 10027

Debra Northern, Director of Social Services

(212)870-6700

dnorthern@theriversidechurchny.org

http://www.theriversidechurchny.org/

The Social Service Ministry of The Riverside Church endeavors to provide access to comprehensive social services for those in economic and social crisis. Riverside Church seeks to enable people in need within the community to more fully support and nurture themselves and their families so that they can move out of poverty. Riverside Church further supports action that lead to a healthy and caring society, free of the oppression of poverty in its various forms.

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Community Impact’s CUNY Assessment Test Preparation

 

– NEW

 4-week course focused on developing the Math and Writing Skills students need to pass the CUNY assessment tests and avoid costly remedial classes. These students are also eligible to take workshops in the broader College Bound program.

  • Classes meet for 2 hours, two days a week
  • Choose either morning (10:30am-12:30pm) or evening (6-8pm) sessions

Sign up today and select “College Road” Program

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TASC (GED) Classes

Community Impact’s TASC (formerly GED) High School Equivalency Classes at 5 levels 
12-week course designed to teach students the skills they need to pass the new NY State Test Assessing Secondary Completion which has replaced the GED.

  • Classes meet for 2½ hours, four days a week Monday -Thursday.
  • Choose either morning (10:30am-1pm) or evening (6-8:30) sessions
  • The Spanish GED class meets in evenings only.
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Community Impact ESL for Adult Learners

ESL classes instill Listening, Speaking, Reading and Writing skills in its students and are offered in five levels from Beginner to Advanced.

  • Classes meet for 2 hours, four days a week Monday -Thursday.
  • Choose either afternoon (4-6pm) or evening (6-8pm) sessions

Sign up today and select “ESL Program”

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Community Impact Adult Classes

The ESL Computer Training class combines ESL instruction with an introduction to computer literacy and work readiness training.
  • Classes meet for 3 hours 3 days a week.
  • Choose either morning (9:30am-12:30pm) or afternoon (12-3pm or 3-6pm)

Sign up today and select “Computer Training”

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College Bound Comprehensive Test Course for Adults

Community Impact

12-week course designed to help students transition after passing the GED to successfully apply, enroll and matriculate in college and consists of a rich array of college readiness workshops along with college level reading, writing and math.

  • Classes meet for 2½ hours, four days a week Monday -Thursday.
  • Choose either morning (10:30am-1pm) or evening (6pm-8:30pm) sessions
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Columbia Community Service

Columbia Community Service (CCS) is one of the oldest organizations on campus.  Its yearly campaign is a means for faculty and staff to Columbia University to support soup kitchens, after-school programs, and more critical services, through direct financial contributions.  With the University covering all administrative expenses, 100% of the contributions go directly to services.  An employee-driven campaign, CCS, solicits donations from faculty and staff from Columbia University, Barnard College, and Teachers College to provide grants to 50 Upper Manhattan nonprofits.

During World War II, the Columbia University Committee for War Relief made critical contributions to the United States war effort, including the United War Fund and the American Red Cross. After the war, this group began to focus on helping the local community surrounding the University, which led to the formation of Columbia Community Service. Since its inception in 1946, CCS has helped countless people in the Columbia area by giving substantial grants and providing valuable resources to local community organizations.

As of April 2014, Columbia Community Service grants benefit:

Adults and Children in Trust (A.C.T.) – High School Internship Program 

Alexander Robertson School

America SCORES! New York

Arts and Minds

Ballet Hispanico of New York

Behind the Book

Bloomingdale School of Music

Broadway Community, Inc. 

Broadway Presbyterian Church Nursery School

Cathedral Community Cares

Children’s Learning Center at Morningside Heights

Columbia Tennis Center – Tennis Development Program

Community Impact

Corpus Christi School

Doing Art Together, Inc.

Everybody Wins! New York

The Family Annex

Figure Skating in Harlem, Inc.

Friends of the Children New York

Graham Windham / Harlem Beacon Center – Family Enrichment Program

Hale House Center, Inc. 

Harlem Academy

The Harlem Chamber Players, Inc.

Harlem Educational Activities Fund, Inc. (H.E.A.F)

Harlem Hospital Adult HIV/AIDS Services

Harlem Lacrosse and Leadership

Harlem Youth Baseball Association, Inc.

Health Leads, Inc.

Legal Outreach, Inc. – Summer Law Institute

Lifeforce in Later Years, Inc. (L.i.LY)

Morningside Retirement & Health Services

P.A.’ L.A.N.T.E Harlem, Inc.

Pediatric Resource Project at Harlem Hospital Center

Purple Circle Day Care Center, Inc.

The Red Balloon Day Care Center, Inc.

Rev. Linnette C. Williamson Memorial Park Association: Arts & Gardens Summer Youth Program

Riverside Park Tiemann Place Volunteers

Saint Mary’s Episcopal Church Soup Kitchen and Food Pantry

Service Program for Older People, Inc. (SPOP) 

SNACK & Friends, Inc.

SoHarlem Creative Outlet

StreetSquash, Inc.

Top Honors, Inc.

Uptown Inner City League

West Harlem Environmental Action (WE ACT for Environmental Justice)

Wendy Hilliard Foundation

West Side Campaign Against Hunger

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