Data Science Institute | Annual Town Hall | 2019

Schapiro Hall (CEPSR) Davis Auditorium

The Data Science Institute of Columbia University's mission is to advance the state-of-the-art in data science; to transform all fields, professions, and sectors through the application of data science; and to ensure the responsible use of data for the benefit of society. The Institute invites the Columbia Community to join us at our annual Town Hall to hear about recent highlights and to discover existing and emerging opportunities for engagement with the Institute. Event Contact Information: Data Science Institute 212-854-5660 datascience@columbia.edu

DATA FOR GOOD: One Person, One Vote

Schapiro Hall (CEPSR) Davis Auditorium

About a quarter of Americans report believing that double voting is a relatively common occurrence, casting doubt on the integrity of elections. But, despite a dearth of documented instances of double voting, it’s hard to know how often such fraud really occurs (people might just be good at covering it up!). I’ll describe a simple statistical trick to directly estimate the rate of double voting — one that builds off the classic “birthday problem” — and show that such behavior is exceedingly rare. I’ll further argue that current efforts to prevent double voting can in fact disenfranchise many legitimate voters. Speaker: Sharad Goel Paper: https://5harad.com/papers/1p1v.pdf Hosted by: The Data Science Institute Working Group on Computational Social Science In conjunction with The Columbia Population Research Center Event Contact Information: Data Science Institute 212-854-5660 datascience@columbia.edu

2019 Louisa Gross Horwitz Prize Lecture #1

Schapiro Hall (CEPSR) Davis Auditorium

2019 Louisa Gross Horwitz Prize Lectures Peter K. Vogt, PhD Professor, Department of Molecular Medicine Scripps Research, La Jolla, CA Lecture #1 “Novel aspects of PI3K Signaling” Thursday, January 9, 2020 10 a.m. Davis Auditorium (Rm. 412), Schapiro Center (CEPSR) 530 W. 120th St. Registration is not required to attend the lecture. Biography: Dr. Vogt, professor of molecular medicine at Scripps Research in La Jolla, California, transformed cancer research with the discovery of the first oncogene, SRC. His mutational analysis of Rous sarcoma virus established the genetic map of retroviruses. Dr. Vogt also discovered oncogenes that play major roles in human biology and in cancer: MYC, JUN, and PI3 kinase. His current work focuses on the control of transcription by MYC, on isoform-specific functions of PI3K and on small molecule inhibitors of oncoproteins. He studied biology and chemistry at the Universities of Würzburg and Tübingen and received his PhD from the Max Planck Institute for Virology [...]