Columbia University - Heyman Center for the Humanities

Belonging to the Conquerors: The Mosquito Confederation and the Competing Conquests of Eighteenth-Century Central America

From: 2022-05-19 12:15 PM
To: 2022-05-19 1:30 PM

Wartime Order and Its Legacies

From: 2022-05-12 12:15 PM
To: 2022-05-12 1:30 PM

Building Publics 2022: Art-Based Experiences and Caregiving Relationships

From: 2022-05-06 2:0 PM
To: 2022-05-06 3:30 PM

Building Publics 2022: Language Pedagogy and Social Justice

From: 2022-05-11 7:0 PM
To: 2022-05-11 9:0 PM

Underwriting and Cyclones in the Indian Ocean

From: 2022-05-05 12:15 PM
To: 2022-05-05 1:30 PM

Building Publics 2022: 34th Ave Story Circle: Reflecting on the Past and Future of Urban Streets

From: 2022-05-04 12:0 PM
To: 2022-05-04 1:30 PM

Translating The End of the World: A Conversation with Dorothy Zinn and Jasmine Pisapia about translating Ernesto de Martino’s La fine del mondo

From: 2022-04-28 4:0 PM
To: 2022-04-28 6:0 PM

Spectral Belonging: Artisanal Reproduction of Landscape Imagery in Nineteenth-Century Chinese Tombs

From: 2022-04-28 12:15 PM
To: 2022-04-28 1:30 PM

Unworlding: AFTRthoughts: A Feminist Theory of Refusal and the Politics of Re-Worlding

From: 2022-04-25 4:0 PM
To: 2022-04-25 5:0 PM

nayture is sumwere else: trans poetics, middle and old English variations

From: 2022-04-27 4:0 PM
To: 2022-04-27 5:0 PM

Building Publics 2022: Unguarded: Art and Restorative Justice

From: 2022-04-27 5:30 PM
To: 2022-04-27 7:30 PM

Revolution 10/13: Brandon Terry on Malcolm X

From: 2022-04-20 6:0 PM
To: 2022-04-20 8:0 PM

Thinking Elsewhere: A Conversation with Shahzia Sikandar

From: 2022-04-20 6:30 PM
To: 2022-04-20 8:0 PM

Building Publics 2022: Speaking of Spirituality

From: 2022-04-19 3:30 PM
To: 2022-04-19 5:0 PM

Contesting Citizenship across the Mediterranean: A Global Legal History of Belonging in the Nineteenth Century

From: 2022-04-14 12:15 PM
To: 2022-04-14 1:30 PM

Building Publics 2022: Mobilities and the City: History and Current Challenges in Mexico City

From: 2022-04-11 7:0 PM
To: 2022-04-11 9:0 PM

Kitchen Table Praxis: Recipes for Belonging in Electronic Music

From: 2022-04-08 12:30 PM
To: 2022-04-08 6:0 PM

Slavery, Antislavery, and the British Empire

From: 2022-04-08 11:0 AM
To: 2022-04-08 12:15 PM

Beyond Airmindedness: Aviation in Toni Morrison’s Song of Solomon

From: 2022-04-07 12:15 PM
To: 2022-04-07 1:30 PM

Emma Francis-Snyder in conversation with Adriana Garriga-López, Carlito Rivera, and Ivan Calaff

From: 2022-04-06 6:0 PM
To: 2022-04-06 8:0 PM

Working towards Equity and Inclusion in Journal Publication

From: 2022-04-04 5:0 PM
To: 2022-04-04 6:30 PM

The Deep History of Incarceration

From: 2022-03-29 6:30 PM
To: 2022-03-29 7:30 PM

Book Talks in Medical Humanities: Sarah Richardson's The Maternal Imprint: The Contested Science of Maternal/Fetal Effects

From: 2022-03-28 6:15 PM
To: 2022-03-28 7:30 PM

Bobbies in Babylon: Black Resistance to British Policing

From: 2022-03-24 12:15 PM
To: 2022-03-24 1:30 PM

Shelter Without Shelter

From: 2022-03-23 2:10 PM
To: 2022-03-23 4:0 PM

Policing the City: An Ethno-Graphic. Didier Fassin and Jake Raynal

From: 2022-03-09 6:0 PM
To: 2022-03-09 8:0 PM

Symposium: Gendering Africa: Musical Perspectives

From: 2022-03-04 10:0 AM
To: 2022-03-04 6:0 PM

Negative Belonging

From: 2022-03-03 12:15 PM
To: 2022-03-03 1:30 PM

Revolution 8/13: Becoming Numerous: Legacies of Queer and Trans Rebellion

From: 2022-03-02 6:0 PM
To: 2022-03-02 8:0 PM
Book Talks In Medical Humanities: Sarah Richardson's The Maternal Imprint: The Contested Science Of Maternal/Fetal Effects • Morningside Area Alliance
Website Richardson

Book Talks in Medical Humanities: Sarah Richardson’s The Maternal Imprint: The Contested Science of Maternal/Fetal Effects

The idea that a woman may leave a biological trace on her gestating offspring has long been a commonplace folk intuition and a matter of scientific intrigue, but the form of that idea has changed dramatically over time. Beginning with the advent of modern genetics at the turn of the twentieth century, biomedical scientists dismissed any notion that a mother—except in cases of extreme deprivation or injury—could alter her offspring’s traits. Consensus asserted that a child’s fate was set by a combination of its genes and post-birth upbringing.

Over the last fifty years, however, this consensus was dismantled, and today, research on the intrauterine environment and its effects on the fetus is emerging as a robust program of study in medicine, public health, psychology, evolutionary biology, and genomics. Collectively, these sciences argue that a woman’s experiences, behaviors, and physiology can have life-altering effects on offspring development.

Tracing a genealogy of ideas about heredity and maternal-fetal effects, this book offers a critical analysis of conceptual and ethical issues—in particular, the staggering implications for maternal well-being and reproductive autonomy—provoked by the striking rise of epigenetics and fetal origins science in postgenomic biology today.

  • Free and open to the public
  • Registration required. See details.

About the Author

Sarah S. Richardson is Professor of the History of Science and of Studies of Women, Gender, and Sexuality at Harvard University. A historian and philosopher of science, Richardson is a leading scholar of gender and science whose work argues for conceptual rigor and social responsibility in scientific research on sex, gender, sexuality, and reproduction. She directs the Harvard GenderSci Lab, a collaborative, interdisciplinary research lab dedicated to generating concepts, methods, and theories for biomedical research on sex and gender. Richardson serves on the Standing Committees for Degrees in Social Studies and for the Mind, Brain, and Behavior Interfaculty Initiative at Harvard.

About the Respondents

Clare McCormack recently concluded a postdoctoral fellowship as a Presidential Scholar in Society and Neuroscience at Columbia University and has now joined the Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry (DCAP) at New York University (NYU) Langone as a Senior Scientist. Her multidisciplinary research is focused on intergenerational transmission of adversity, as well as the psychological, neurobiological, and social processes that are critical for examining maternal-child wellbeing in the perinatal period.

Alexis Walker is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Medical Humanities and Ethics in Columbia’s Vagelos College of Physicians and Surgeons. She completed her PhD in Science and Technology Studies at Cornell, and her research investigates financial interests in biomedicine.

About the Moderator

Arden Hegele is a Lecturer in the Discipline of English and Comparative Literature and an affiliated faculty member with Medical Humanities (Institute of Comparative Literature and Society) and Medical Humanities and Ethics (Columbia University Medical Center). She is interested in the intersection of medical knowledge with formalist and historicist literary approaches. Her research in Romanticism has been published in core journals, such as European Romantic ReviewRomanticismThe Byron Journal, and Keats-Shelley Journal, and she has also published in Partial AnswersGender and Education, and Persuasions. She was an SOF/Heyman Fellow from 2016-2019.

Please email disability@columbia.edu to request disability accommodations. Advance notice is necessary to arrange for some accessibility needs.

Date

Mar 28 2022
Expired!

Time

6:15 pm - 7:30 pm

Formats (virtual, in person, hybrid)

Virtual

Venue

Online
online

Organizer

Columbia University - Heyman Center for the Humanities
Phone
(212) 854-8443
Website
www.heymancenter.org