Columbia University - Heyman Center for the Humanities

I saw Othello’s visage in his mind': Visualizing Othello in Nineteenth-Century British Theatre

From: 2022-12-08 12:15 PM
To: 2022-12-08 1:45 PM

Moses Hadas and Historical Black Colleges and Universities - Classics, Racism, Segregation

From: 2022-12-07 6:10 PM
To: 2022-12-07 7:30 PM

Elaine Combs-Schilling Memorial Lecture: Mishuana Goeman

From: 2022-12-01 6:0 PM
To: 2022-12-01 8:0 PM

Lush Aftermath: Race, Labor, Scorched Earth

From: 2022-12-01 12:15 PM
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Celebrating Recent Work by Nadia Abu El-Haj

From: 2022-11-17 6:15 AM
To: 2022-11-17 7:30 PM

A History of Decarbonization

From: 2022-11-17 12:45 PM
To: 2022-11-17 2:15 PM

The Many Afterlives of Incarceration with John Gargano

From: 2022-11-16 6:10 PM
To: 2022-11-16 7:30 PM

Website as Archive for the Public Humanities

From: 2022-11-16 2:0 PM
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Book Talks in Medical Humanities: Heather Davis's Plastic Matter

From: 2022-11-15 6:0 PM
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Alvin Baltrop's Voyeurism: Sexual Perversity, Race, and the Historical Uses of Photography

From: 2022-11-10 5:0 PM
To: 2022-11-10 6:30 PM

Contestations of Salience and the Theory of Everyday Political Conflict

From: 2022-11-10 12:15 PM
To: 2022-11-10 1:45 PM

2022 Dean’s Distinguished Lecture in the Humanities at the Columbia University Vagelos College of Physicians and Surgeons: Carol Becker

From: 2022-10-27 4:30 PM
To: 2022-10-27 6:30 PM

The Art of the Social Practice Arts Incubator

From: 2022-11-02 2:0 PM
To: 2022-11-02 4:0 PM

Mapping Injustice: Experiments in Critical Cartographies and Digital Mapping Practices

From: 2022-10-19 2:0 PM
To: 2022-10-19 4:0 PM

Book Talks in Medical Humanities: Britt Wray's Generation Dread: Finding Purpose in an Age of Climate Change

From: 2022-10-18 6:0 PM
To: 2022-10-18 7:0 PM

A Rose from Canefield

From: 2022-10-13 12:15 PM
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Utopia 2/13: Cooperation Jackson with Kali Akuno

From: 2022-10-12 6:15 PM
To: 2022-10-12 8:45 PM

How Initial Peasant Support for Shining Path Shifted to Violent Resistance in Peru

From: 2022-10-06 12:15 PM
To: 2022-10-06 1:45 PM

Mormons, Magic and Tarot

From: 2022-10-11 5:30 PM
To: 2022-10-11 7:0 PM

Last Call at the Hotel Imperial: A Conversation between Deborah Cohen and Adam Tooze

From: 2022-10-10 12:30 PM
To: 2022-10-10 2:0 PM

The Meddlers: Sovereignty, Empire, and Birth of Global Economic Gov

From: 2022-10-03 6:0 PM
To: 2022-10-03 7:10 PM

The Long March of Incarceration: from Ancient Prisons to Incarcerated Slavery

From: 2022-09-28 6:10 PM
To: 2022-09-28 7:15 PM

Brotherhood of Barristers: Gender, Space and the Culture of the Bar, 1840-1940

From: 2022-09-22 5:0 PM
To: 2022-09-22 6:0 PM

Beyond Nationality: Belonging and Empire in Ottoman North Africa

From: 2022-09-22 12:15 PM
To: 2022-09-22 1:45 PM

Belonging to the Conquerors: The Mosquito Confederation and the Competing Conquests of Eighteenth-Century Central America

From: 2022-05-19 12:15 PM
To: 2022-05-19 1:30 PM

Wartime Order and Its Legacies

From: 2022-05-12 12:15 PM
To: 2022-05-12 1:30 PM

Building Publics 2022: Art-Based Experiences and Caregiving Relationships

From: 2022-05-06 2:0 PM
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Building Publics 2022: Language Pedagogy and Social Justice

From: 2022-05-11 7:0 PM
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Underwriting and Cyclones in the Indian Ocean

From: 2022-05-05 12:15 PM
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Building Publics 2022: 34th Ave Story Circle: Reflecting on the Past and Future of Urban Streets

From: 2022-05-04 12:0 PM
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Translating The End of the World: A Conversation with Dorothy Zinn and Jasmine Pisapia about translating Ernesto de Martino’s La fine del mondo

From: 2022-04-28 4:0 PM
To: 2022-04-28 6:0 PM

Spectral Belonging: Artisanal Reproduction of Landscape Imagery in Nineteenth-Century Chinese Tombs

From: 2022-04-28 12:15 PM
To: 2022-04-28 1:30 PM

Unworlding: AFTRthoughts: A Feminist Theory of Refusal and the Politics of Re-Worlding

From: 2022-04-25 4:0 PM
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nayture is sumwere else: trans poetics, middle and old English variations

From: 2022-04-27 4:0 PM
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Building Publics 2022: Unguarded: Art and Restorative Justice

From: 2022-04-27 5:30 PM
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Revolution 10/13: Brandon Terry on Malcolm X

From: 2022-04-20 6:0 PM
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Thinking Elsewhere: A Conversation with Shahzia Sikandar

From: 2022-04-20 6:30 PM
To: 2022-04-20 8:0 PM

Building Publics 2022: Speaking of Spirituality

From: 2022-04-19 3:30 PM
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Contesting Citizenship across the Mediterranean: A Global Legal History of Belonging in the Nineteenth Century

From: 2022-04-14 12:15 PM
To: 2022-04-14 1:30 PM

Building Publics 2022: Mobilities and the City: History and Current Challenges in Mexico City

From: 2022-04-11 7:0 PM
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Kitchen Table Praxis: Recipes for Belonging in Electronic Music

From: 2022-04-08 12:30 PM
To: 2022-04-08 6:0 PM

Slavery, Antislavery, and the British Empire

From: 2022-04-08 11:0 AM
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Beyond Airmindedness: Aviation in Toni Morrison’s Song of Solomon

From: 2022-04-07 12:15 PM
To: 2022-04-07 1:30 PM

Emma Francis-Snyder in conversation with Adriana Garriga-López, Carlito Rivera, and Ivan Calaff

From: 2022-04-06 6:0 PM
To: 2022-04-06 8:0 PM

Working towards Equity and Inclusion in Journal Publication

From: 2022-04-04 5:0 PM
To: 2022-04-04 6:30 PM

The Deep History of Incarceration

From: 2022-03-29 6:30 PM
To: 2022-03-29 7:30 PM

Book Talks in Medical Humanities: Sarah Richardson's The Maternal Imprint: The Contested Science of Maternal/Fetal Effects

From: 2022-03-28 6:15 PM
To: 2022-03-28 7:30 PM

Bobbies in Babylon: Black Resistance to British Policing

From: 2022-03-24 12:15 PM
To: 2022-03-24 1:30 PM

Shelter Without Shelter

From: 2022-03-23 2:10 PM
To: 2022-03-23 4:0 PM

Policing the City: An Ethno-Graphic. Didier Fassin and Jake Raynal

From: 2022-03-09 6:0 PM
To: 2022-03-09 8:0 PM

Symposium: Gendering Africa: Musical Perspectives

From: 2022-03-04 10:0 AM
To: 2022-03-04 6:0 PM

Negative Belonging

From: 2022-03-03 12:15 PM
To: 2022-03-03 1:30 PM

Revolution 8/13: Becoming Numerous: Legacies of Queer and Trans Rebellion

From: 2022-03-02 6:0 PM
To: 2022-03-02 8:0 PM
Celebrating Recent Work By Nadia Abu El-Haj • Morningside Area Alliance
Celebrating Recent Work by Nadia Abu El-Haj

Celebrating Recent Work by Nadia Abu El-Haj

Combat Trauma: Imaginaries of War and Citizenship in post-9/11 America
by Nadia Abu El-Haj

Americans have long been asked to support the troops and care for veterans’ psychological wounds. Who, though, does this injunction serve?

As acclaimed scholar Nadia Abu El-Haj argues here, in the American public’s imagination, the traumatized soldier stands in for destructive wars abroad, with decisive ramifications in the post-9/11 era. Across the political spectrum the language of soldier trauma is used to discuss American warfare, producing a narrative in which traumatized soldiers are the only acknowledged casualties of war, while those killed by American firepower are largely sidelined and forgotten.

In this wide-ranging and fascinating study of the meshing of medicine, science, and politics, Abu El-Haj explores the concept of post-traumatic stress disorder and the history of its medical diagnosis. While antiwar Vietnam War veterans sought to address their psychological pain even as they maintained full awareness of their guilt and responsibility for perpetrating atrocities on the killing fields of Vietnam, by the 1980s, a peculiar convergence of feminist activism against sexual violence and Reagan’s right-wing “war on crime” transformed the idea of PTSD into a condition of victimhood. In so doing, the meaning of Vietnam veterans’ trauma would also shift, moving away from a political space of reckoning with guilt and complicity to one that cast them as blameless victims of a hostile public upon their return home. This is how, in the post-9/11 era of the Wars on Terror, the injunction to “support our troops,” came to both sustain US militarism and also shields American civilians from the reality of wars fought ostensibly in their name.

In this compelling and crucial account, Nadia Abu El-Haj challenges us to think anew about the devastations of the post-9/11 era.

This event will be in person at the Heyman Center and live-streamed online. Please register for both in-person and virtual attendance via the link.

Please email disability@columbia.edu to request disability accommodations. Advance notice is necessary to arrange for some accessibility needs.

About the Author

Nadia Abu El-Haj is Ann Whitney Olin Professor in the Departments of Anthropology at Barnard College and Columbia University, Co-Director of the Center for Palestine Studies, and Chair of the Governing Board of the Society of Fellows/Heyman Center for the Humanities at Columbia University. She also serves as Vice President and Vice Chair of the Board at The Institute for Palestine Studies in Washington DC. The recipient of numerous awards, including from the Social Science Research Council, the Wenner Gren Foundation, the MacArthur Foundation, the Harvard Academy for Area and International Studies, the Institute for Advanced Study at Princeton, and the Harry Frank Guggenheim Foundation, she is the author of numerous journal articles published on topics ranging from the history of archaeology in Palestine to the question of race and genomics today.

About the Speakers

Thomas W. Dodman is an Assistant Professor of French at Columbia University. His first book, What Nostalgia Was: War, Empire, and the Time of a Deadly Emotion explores how people once died of nostalgia in order to tell a larger story about social transformation and alienation in the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries. He also co-edits the French journal Sensibilités: histoire, critique & sciences sociales, and serves on the editorial board of Critical Historical Studies.

Catherine Fennell’s work examines the cultural transformation of the American welfare state and the effects of this transformation on the politics of citizenship, belonging and race within redeveloping cities. Through her ethnographic research, she has focused on how large-scale changes in the urban built environment shape the ways in which urbanites come to understand social difference, and practice new forms of social care, concern and intimacy.

Miriam Ticktin is an Associate Professor of Anthropology at the CUNY Graduate Center. She came from the New School for Social Research, where she was Chair of Anthropology from 2016-2018, Co-Director of the Zolberg Institute on Migration and Mobility [newschool.edu] between 2013-2016 and Director of Gender Studies from 2012-2013. She received her PhD in Anthropology at Stanford University and the École des hautes études en sciences sociales in Paris, France, and an MA in English Literature from Oxford as a Rhodes Scholar. Miriam also was a Fellow in the Society of Fellows (2002-2004).

Date

Nov 17 2022
Expired!

Time

6:15 am - 7:30 pm

Formats (virtual, in person, hybrid)

Hybrid

Venue

Columbia University - The Heyman Center
74 Morningside Dr, New York, NY 10027

Venue 2

Online
online
Category

Organizer

Columbia University - Heyman Center for the Humanities
Phone
(212) 854-8443
Website
www.heymancenter.org

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