//Columbia University Media

Faculty Q&A: Professor Farah Griffin Examines Three Pioneering Women Artists in 1940s Harlem

While researching her new book Harlem Nocturne: Women Artists and Progressive Politics During World War II, Farah Griffin, the William B. Ransford Professor of English, Comparative Literature and African American Studies, unearthed lots of evidence of the many stories of the period that her mother has shared with her over the years.

Faculty Q&A: Professor Farah Griffin Examines Three Pioneering Women Artists in 1940s Harlem2013-09-24T16:03:00-04:00

School of Arts Writing Professor Named 2013 MacArthur Foundation ‘Genius’ Fellow

With a nod to his “tightly crafted works of fiction and nonfiction” the MacArthur Foundation today announced that Donald Antrim, associate professor in the Writing Program at the School of the Arts, will be among the 24 “genius” fellows it named for 2013. Antrim is the author of the novels Elect Mr. Robinson for a Better World, The Hundred Brothers and The Verificationist, as well as a memoir, The Afterlife. He contributes fiction and nonfiction to The New Yorker, and his work has appeared in The Paris Review and Harper’s.

School of Arts Writing Professor Named 2013 MacArthur Foundation ‘Genius’ Fellow2013-09-25T19:09:00-04:00

3595 Broadway Construction Activities for the Next Two Weeks

Columbia University is constructing a new 12-story building at 3595 Broadway on the southwest corner of Broadway and 148th Street. The Meeting with God Church, currently located at 3581 Broadway at 147th Street, will be moving into the ground level space of this new building. The remaining areas of the new building will include affordable housing units for some residents currently living in the area of Manhattanville in West Harlem where the C University is building a new campus. The building is expected to be completed in 2015. Construction Update for the weeks of September 30, 2013 and October 7, 2013 What is Happening Excavation/foundation work Finish underpinning (reinforcing) a portion of the south wall of the site What to Expect The community should expect the following in the coming weeks: Regular weekday work hours: 7:00 a.m. — 4:00 p.m. Small machinery on site Parking lane closures around the project site Please note that all activities [...]

3595 Broadway Construction Activities for the Next Two Weeks2014-09-30T20:54:18-04:00

Columbia Libraries Acquire Archives of Mad Magazine Cartoonist Al Jaffee

Age has hardly slowed the legendary cartoonist Al Jaffee. At 92, with the still sonorous voice of a radio announcer, he continues to freelance for Mad magazine, where he has worked for 58 years, creating such iconic features as “Snappy Answers to Stupid Questions” and, most notably, the Mad fold-in. Now, Jaffee and his wife Joyce have donated his archives to Columbia’s Rare Book & Manuscript Library, and those who grew up on his subversive, entertaining comics can enjoy and study the remarkable output of his 70-year career.

Columbia Libraries Acquire Archives of Mad Magazine Cartoonist Al Jaffee2013-10-01T16:38:00-04:00

Research Finds Outright Grants of Cash Are Surprisingly Effective Form of Aid to the Poor

The classic proverb says: If you give a man a fish, he will eat for a day. Teach him how to fish, and he will have food for a lifetime. Christopher Blattman’s research suggests that if you just give the man cash, he will buy a fishing pole and learn how to fish himself. Blattman, an assistant professor of international and public affairs and political science, recently completed a four-year study of a government-run program in northern Uganda that gave cash to groups of young people so they could learn a trade and start their own businesses. The results surprised him and convinced him that outright grants are the best way to give aid.

Research Finds Outright Grants of Cash Are Surprisingly Effective Form of Aid to the Poor2013-10-07T16:06:00-04:00

Rare Book and Manuscript Library Acquires Serge Prokofiev Collection

Columbia University Libraries/Information Services’ Rare Book & Manuscript Library (RBML) is pleased to announce the acquisition of the collection of Russian composer Serge Prokofiev (1891-1953). The Serge Prokofiev Foundation has chosen the RBML as the repository for the archival material under its control from Prokofiev’s 18 years in the West.

Rare Book and Manuscript Library Acquires Serge Prokofiev Collection2013-10-14T20:00:00-04:00

Oceanographer Studies Clues to Global Warming, Develops Educational Tools for Science

Sonya Dyhrman’s interest in marine biology began when she was a child, exploring tidal pools with her grandfather on the coast near her Tacoma, Washington home. For a science project in high school she studied toxin-producing microbes in Puget Sound that accumulate in shellfish during parts of the year and can cause paralysis and even death in humans if those shellfish are consumed. Now a microbial oceanographer at Columbia’s Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory and an associate professor of earth and environmental sciences, her research focuses on tiny microbes in the ocean that play a role in the earth’s climate.

Oceanographer Studies Clues to Global Warming, Develops Educational Tools for Science2013-10-28T19:33:00-04:00

Hurricane Sandy, One Year Later

The year since Hurricane Sandy blew ashore in the New York area has been one of rebuilding and searching for how best to prevent the level of destruction and death it brought with it. Columbia, with experts across multiple schools and disciplines and broad expertise in climate science, has played an important role in the recovery. “We have 700 people in the Earth Institute working on this all the time,” said Steve Cohen, the institute’s executive director. “The Lamont Doherty Observatory has close to 100 doctoral level scientists working on this all the time.”

Hurricane Sandy, One Year Later2013-10-29T15:52:00-04:00

An Appreciation of Arthur Danto

Arthur Danto has just died. In two places where Arthur worked for many decades – Columbia’s Philosophy Department and the Journal of Philosophy – there had always been a general feeling among us that much as he loved and laboured here, he found us too confining. This was a source of pride rather than hurt. It is an apt measure of the limits of the academy that we should take pride in the fact that every now and then we had among us someone whose talents and intellectual appetites far surpass the nourishment that a mere department or journal or even a professionalized discipline such as Philosophy, can offer.

An Appreciation of Arthur Danto2013-10-29T18:28:00-04:00

Lamont Doherty Scientist Tries to Predict Rise in Ocean Levels

Columbia climatologist Maureen Raymo is trying to predict the planet’s future by looking to its past. About 3 million years ago, prior to the last Ice Age, carbon dioxide (CO2) levels were roughly the same level they are now – about 400 parts per million. But they arrived there far more gradually. Raymo, a marine geologist and paleoclimatologist at Columbia’s Lamont Doherty Earth Observatory, is studying how much those levels caused the oceans to rise. From that, scientists can figure out how much of Earth’s land mass may be inundated as the climate warms and polar ice caps melt.

Lamont Doherty Scientist Tries to Predict Rise in Ocean Levels2013-10-30T15:20:00-04:00

Columbia Celebrates Return of Naval ROTC

This autumn, Columbia not only marks Veteran's Day together with more than 600 student military veterans now enrolled at the University, but also the official return of the Naval Reserve Officers Training Corps after a 40-year absence. A new class of white-clad NROTC midshipmen, veterans, faculty, students, members of the administration and alumni gathered at the Italian Academy in September to commemorate the reinstitution of the program.

Columbia Celebrates Return of Naval ROTC2013-11-08T16:41:00-04:00

Columbia Climate Scientist Faced Threat of Somali Pirates on Research Mission off Horn of Africa

Paleoclimatologist Peter B. deMenocal was on one of the last research vessels to ply the waters off the Horn of Africa before the region was declared off limits to scientists due to the threat posed by Somali pirates—a peril vividly illustrated in this fall’s hit movie, Captain Phillips. His research, part of a Lamont-led initiative called Climate and Life, is challenging prevailing theories that climate in North Africa changed over thousands of years. He concluded that the desertification of the Sahara happened over just 200 years, which he notes is “a wink of time geologically.”

Columbia Climate Scientist Faced Threat of Somali Pirates on Research Mission off Horn of Africa2013-11-11T20:00:00-04:00
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