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In this podcast conversation with @cbfinfo, union faculty member @ecampbellreed...

In this podcast conversation with @cbfinfo, Union faculty member @ecampbellreed …

In this podcast conversation with @cbfinfo, union faculty member @ecampbellreed...

In this podcast conversation with @cbfinfo, Union faculty member @ecampbellreed explores the importance of teaching pastoral theology in ways that are relevant to “the care and justice that the world needs,” especially in the midst of a pandemic.
https://t.co/O6T1M1VmeM *


Source by Union Seminary

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In this podcast conversation with @cbfinfo, union faculty member @ecampbellreed...

In this podcast conversation with @cbfinfo, Union faculty member @ecampbellreed …

In this podcast conversation with @cbfinfo, union faculty member @ecampbellreed...

In this podcast conversation with @cbfinfo, Union faculty member @ecampbellreed explores the importance of teaching pastoral theology in ways that are relevant to “the care and justice that the world needs,” especially in the midst of a pandemic.
https://t.co/O6T1M1VmeM *


Source by Union Seminary

Happening on jan. 31: join and sponsors, senator john liu, and assembly member

Happening on Jan. 31: Join and sponsors, Senator John Liu, and Assembly Member

Happening on Jan. 31: Join #TCTakeAction and sponsors, Senator John Liu, and Assembly Member Ron Kim as they discuss NY state legislation that would require public schools to provide curriculum in Asian American history and civic impact. Register 👉 https://t.co/xGNuK0yO5l https://t.co/QQdj2aMWrF *


Source by Teachers College, CU

Join union’s center for community engagement & social justice and pride in the p...

Join Union’s Center for Community Engagement & Social Justice and Pride in the P…

Join union’s center for community engagement & social justice and pride in the p...

Join Union’s Center for Community Engagement & Social Justice and Pride in the Pews on Feb 24 for The State of the Black Church. This one-day symposium seeks to create pathways for healing that leads to more inclusive Black faith-based spaces.https://t.co/FBKxy5sLBi https://t.co/6XWskD57fY *


Source by Union Seminary

Msm faculty focus: shmuel katz (bm '98, mm '00) performs with msm orchestral performance program students on february 1

MSM Faculty Focus: Shmuel Katz (BM ’98, MM ’00) performs with MSM Orchestral Performance Program students on February 1

Msm faculty focus: shmuel katz (bm '98, mm '00) performs with msm orchestral performance program students on february 1

MSM viola faculty member Shmuel Katz is an MSM alumnus who is currently Associate Principal Viola in the Grammy-winning Metropolitan Opera Orchestra, with whom he’s been playing for more than a decade.

Shmuel and other MSM Orchestral Performance (OP) Program faculty will be playing alongside their students in the upcoming MSM Orchestral Performance Faculty–Student concert on February 1, conducted by David Chan, Head of Orchestral Performance Program and Concertmaster of the MET Orchestra.

Shmuel speaks with us about the concert, his time as a MSM student, and gives auditioning advice.

Tell us about the upcoming Orchestral Performance Program concert? Why are you looking forward to it?

Shmuel: The upcoming concert on February first will include works by Debussy, Rimsky-Korsakov, and Revueltas. Several faculty members of the OP program will be joining their students, playing side-by-side with them. I am very excited about several aspects of this concert. First of all, I love playing with students, there is always such a level of energy and enthusiasm that makes these type of concerts so much fun. Secondly, our conductor for this program, David Chan, is the concertmaster of my orchestra Metropolitan Opera Orchestra. I always love hearing his playing and in this concert I get to work with him as the maestro. I am also excited that Sheryl Staples, Associate Concertmaster at the New York Philharmonic will play the famous solos in Scheherezade.

What is it that you think makes the OP Program an important one?

Shmuel: There are many ways for a music student to make a career in music when they’re out in the “real world”. They can teach, find a chamber group, or play solos. Most of us though, find a career in orchestra. It can be a great way to make music part of your life for many many years and make a living doing that. In the OP Program, we concentrate on that potential life in music: from learning how to prepare and perform auditions in order to win a job, to learning about playing in a professional orchestra from top players in the MET orchestra and the New York Philharmonic.

Msm faculty focus: shmuel katz (bm '98, mm '00) performs with msm orchestral performance program students on february 1

Shmuel Katz is Associate Principal Viola with the Metropolitan Opera Orchestra shown here

What did you study at MSM, and what are your strongest memories of studying here?

Shmuel: I studied violin with Pinchas Zukerman and Patinka Kopec for my undergrad and finished my master’s degree on violin and viola with Guarneri Quartet‘s legendary violist Michael Tree. I feel very lucky that I got to learn with some amazing musicians at MSM. Besides my private teachers I learned so much from Isidore Cohen and Mitchel Stern in chamber music and orchestral repertoire with Enrico DiCecco.

What projects or special performances do you have coming up this year? Tell us about your work with the MET orchestra!

Shmuel: This is my first official season as Associate Principal Viola at the MET. I have been a member of the orchestra since 2018 and won an audition last May for the Associate Principal position. I am excited about a couple of programs coming up soon with guest conductor Daniele Rustioni. He will be conducting Bartok Concerto for Orchestra for our upcoming Carnegie Hall concert and after that we will begin rehearsals on Verdi’s Falstaff which is always a real fun opera to play. I am also excited about playing Lohengrin for the first time with our music director Yannick Nézet-Séguin.

Audition season is coming up: what audition tips would you give students who hope to attend MSM?

Shmuel: Be yourselves. Don’t try to play in a way you think “we” would want you to play. One of the best parts of sitting in on an audition is hearing students’ musicality, personality, tone, imagination. Every student sounds different and brings a different approach to the music and to their instrument.

Msm faculty focus: shmuel katz (bm '98, mm '00) performs with msm orchestral performance program students on february 1

“One of the best parts of sitting in on an audition is hearing students’ musicality, personality, tone, imagination. Every student sounds different and brings a different approach to the music and to their instrument.”

Read our interview with JT Kane, MSM’s Dean of Instrumental Studies and Orchestral Performance, who speaks about the upcoming Orchestral Performance program concert, and what makes the program so important:



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A simple guide to better heart health

A Simple Guide to Better Heart Health

A simple guide to better heart health

Deepak L. Bhatt, MD, MPH

Heart disease is one of the most significant public health concerns in the United States, affecting men, women, and all racial and ethnic groups, with some populations disproportionally affected.

There’s really no secret to better heart health. If you’re wondering what steps you can take to improve your heart health, here are six simple tips from one of the leading experts, Deepak L. Bhatt, MD, MPH, the new Director of Mount Sinai Heart, who leads the educational, research, and clinical cardiovascular work of the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai and the Mount Sinai Health System.

“A healthy lifestyle goes a long way to reducing the risk of heart disease and, as it turns out, also reduces the risk of things like diabetes and cancer,” says Dr. Bhatt who joined Mount Sinai from Harvard Medical School and Brigham and Women’s Hospital Heart and Vascular Center.

Here are Dr. Bhatt’s suggestions for improving your heart health.

Eat Better

The best thing to do to improve heart health is to maintain a good diet. I endorse a plant-based diet, which means one that has lots of fresh fruit and vegetables and whole grains. It doesn’t have to be vegetarian, but it can be. You should avoid red meat if you can, or at least limit how much red meat you eat.

Work Up a Sweat

Daily exercise is important. You don’t need a rigorous exercise routine at the gym. For people who don’t really like to exercise, I’m talking about any vigorous physical activity. It can be 30 minutes of brisk walking—ideally something where you work up a sweat. Or it can be something you really enjoy, like gardening. Any physical activity is better than none, even if it’s just a matter of parking your car further from the store or your office and walking a bit more, or taking the stairs instead of the elevator. Those little doses of exercise can add up over a lifetime.

Eat Well, But Not Too Much

Maintaining a good weight is important. The natural tendency is to put on weight. Even an extra five or 10 pounds can increase your risk of diabetes, high blood pressure, or high cholesterol, which in turn increase the risk of heart disease and other medical problems. And taking off even small amounts of weight can make a difference.

Sleep Right

This one may surprise you. Sleep is very important. It can be hard to get a good night’s sleep these days. Everyone’s got a busy chaotic lifestyle, it seems. Proper sleep can help you maintain a normal weight and reduce mental stress. A recent study showed that people who slept less than the recommended amount had higher rates of obesity, diabetes, and high blood pressure. Insufficient sleep doesn’t get the respect it deserves as a cardiovascular risk factor.

No Smoking

I encourage you not to start smoking, and to stop if you are smoking. Smoking raises the risk of heart disease and cancer probably more than any other single factor. It’s not just cigarettes and cigars. It includes vaping, which is really catching on among young people, and marijuana. Some may not be happy to hear that. But the reality is that all these forms of smoking raise the risk of cardiovascular disease.

Know What to Do if You Suspect a Heart Attack

If you think you or someone else may be having a heart attack, call 911 immediately. You should call if you are having significant chest discomfort. Don’t tough it out at home. Don’t decide you’re going to drive yourself to the hospital. Don’t ask your spouse to drive you. If your heart should stop beating, blood will stop flowing to the brain, and in just a few minutes the lack of oxygen can cause significant damage. You should also consider taking a basic CPR course. These simple chest compressions can keep the blood flowing from the heart. You might also want to take notice of where you could find an automated external defibrillator (AED), say in your office, at school, or when you are traveling. These simple devices can determine if someone has an abnormal heart rhythm and deliver an electric shock to restore the rhythm to normal. The devices have very simple instructions and can talk you through what to do.

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New york to expand composting citywide, targeting trash and rats

New York to Expand Composting Citywide, Targeting Trash and Rats

A decade after former Mayor Michael R. Bloomberg co-opted a line from “Star Trek” to declare composting the “final recycling frontier,” New York City is finally poised to unveil plans to implement what it is calling the nation’s largest composting program.

On Thursday, Mayor Eric Adams will announce that the city will commit to a 20-month timeline to bring composting to all five boroughs.

The announcement will be part of the mayor’s State of the City address on Thursday at the Queens Theater in Flushing Meadows Corona Park.

The program allowing New Yorkers to put biodegradable refuse into brown bins for composting will be voluntary; there are no current plans to make the composting program mandatory, a step that some experts say is key to its success. But in an interview, Jessica Tisch, the commissioner of the Sanitation Department, said that the agency was talking about the possibility of mandating the composting of yard waste.

“This program is going to represent the first time that many New Yorkers have ever had access to curbside composting,” Ms. Tisch said. “Let them get used to it.”

The announcement comes a month after the city paused a popular boroughwide composting program in Queens, a move that sowed distress among the city’s avid band of food recyclers.

The city’s timeline calls for the program to restart in Queens on March 27, expand to Brooklyn on Oct. 2, begin in the Bronx and Staten Island on March 25, 2024, and finally launch in Manhattan on Oct. 7, 2024.

As Mr. Adams enters his second year in office, he has continued to focus on crime, the budgetary challenges of accommodating an influx of migrants from the southern border, and street cleanliness, with an unusual (and unusually personal) focus on rats.

“By launching the largest curbside composting program in the country, we’ll be dealing a blow to New York City’s rats, cleaning up our streets and keeping millions of pounds of kitchen and yard waste out of landfills,” Mayor Adams said in a statement. “By the end of 2024, every New Yorker, all 8.5 million people, will have the solution they’ve been waiting two decades for, and I’m proud my administration was able to get it done.”

The city’s progress toward Mr. de Blasio’s goal has been nominal. Its so-called curbside diversion rate for recyclables now stands at a paltry 17 percent. Seattle, by way of comparison, had a nearly 63 percent diversion rate in 2020, according to the Citizens Budget Commission, a nonpartisan watchdog group.

In an interview on Wednesday, Ms. Tisch acknowledged that the city had not made enough progress since 2015 to “realistically believe that we will reach zero waste by 2030.”

But she also predicted that the new composting program would dramatically increase the amount of waste diverted from landfills — part of the city’s efforts to address climate change. When added to a landfill, yard waste and food scraps produce methane, a gas that traps heat in the atmosphere and warms the planet.

New York City’s composting program has gone through many fits and starts over the years. Today, the city requires many businesses to separate their organic waste, though it is unclear how effectively the city enforces those rules. The city said it does not collect data on how much waste the program diverts from landfills.

The city was also already offering voluntary municipal curbside composting in scattered parts of Brooklyn, the Bronx and Manhattan when Mr. Adams announced in August that it would come to every single residence in Queens that October.

As part of the program in Queens, which paused for the winter in December, collection times coincided with the pickup of recyclables. And residents did not have to individually opt in to the new service. The program cost roughly $2 million, the department said.

Some composters who had successfully altered their habits to accommodate the new program said the December pause was frustrating and, by upending newly established routines, counterproductive.

But city officials quickly labeled it a triumph, saying it outperformed the prior, existing program and was cheaper, too.

“We finally have a mass market sustainability program that will meaningfully move the diversion rate in New York City,” Ms. Tisch said.

The program will cost $22.5 million in the 2026 fiscal year, the first full fiscal year when it will be running citywide, she said. The city will also have to spend $45 million upfront this fiscal year to buy new trucks to collect the compost.

Once collected, the department will transport the compost to anaerobic digesters in Brooklyn and Massachusetts, and a city-run compost facility on Staten Island, among other places.

Citing a potential recession and the drop-off in pandemic-related federal aid, Mr. Adams has been taking steps to reduce costs, including cuts to public libraries that leaders say could force them to reduce hours and programming. The Sanitation Department has been one area where he has shown a willingness to fund new programs.

Sandra Goldmark, director of campus sustainability and climate action at Barnard College, said she was “thrilled” by the mayor’s commitment and hoped that the program would eventually become mandatory for businesses and residences, just like recycling.

Barnard has worked to implement composting, she said, but it requires a “culture shift” to help people understand the benefits.

“It’s actually so much better in your home — there’s no big, giant trash bag with smelly, gnarly stuff,” she said. “You put wet food scraps in a separate container and it makes all of your trash less gross.”



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In this podcast conversation with @cbfinfo, union faculty member @ecampbellreed...

In this podcast conversation with @cbfinfo, Union faculty member @ecampbellreed …

In this podcast conversation with @cbfinfo, union faculty member @ecampbellreed...

In this podcast conversation with @cbfinfo, Union faculty member @ecampbellreed explores the importance of teaching pastoral theology in ways that are relevant to “the care and justice that the world needs,” especially in the midst of a pandemic.
https://t.co/O6T1M1VmeM *


Source by Union Seminary

Layout A (with pagination)

In this podcast conversation with @cbfinfo, union faculty member @ecampbellreed...

In this podcast conversation with @cbfinfo, Union faculty member @ecampbellreed …

In this podcast conversation with @cbfinfo, union faculty member @ecampbellreed...

In this podcast conversation with @cbfinfo, Union faculty member @ecampbellreed explores the importance of teaching pastoral theology in ways that are relevant to “the care and justice that the world needs,” especially in the midst of a pandemic.
https://t.co/O6T1M1VmeM *


Source by Union Seminary

Happening on jan. 31: join and sponsors, senator john liu, and assembly member

Happening on Jan. 31: Join and sponsors, Senator John Liu, and Assembly Member

Happening on Jan. 31: Join #TCTakeAction and sponsors, Senator John Liu, and Assembly Member Ron Kim as they discuss NY state legislation that would require public schools to provide curriculum in Asian American history and civic impact. Register 👉 https://t.co/xGNuK0yO5l https://t.co/QQdj2aMWrF *


Source by Teachers College, CU

Join union’s center for community engagement & social justice and pride in the p...

Join Union’s Center for Community Engagement & Social Justice and Pride in the P…

Join union’s center for community engagement & social justice and pride in the p...

Join Union’s Center for Community Engagement & Social Justice and Pride in the Pews on Feb 24 for The State of the Black Church. This one-day symposium seeks to create pathways for healing that leads to more inclusive Black faith-based spaces.https://t.co/FBKxy5sLBi https://t.co/6XWskD57fY *


Source by Union Seminary